B. Smyth: 5 Things To Know About The R&B Singer Dead At 28

A young star of the R&B and hip-hop community has fallen. B. Smyth passed away from pulmonary fibrosis on Nov. 17 at the age of 28. Here's what we know.

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Image Credit: Owen Sweeney/Shutterstock

  • B. Smyth (b. Brandom Smith) passed away on Nov. 17 at age 28.
  • B. Smyth was battling pulmonary fibrosis when he passed.
  • B. Smyth worked with 2 Chainz, Young Thug, Rick Ross, and Future.

“I thought I would never have to make a video like this. I never dreamed of making a video like this,” said B. Smyth‘s older brother, Denzil, in a video posted to the musician’s account on Nov. 17. Earlier in the day, Smyth, 28, passed away” from “respiratory failure after a long battle with pulmonary fibrosis,” according to Denzil. Smyth’s older brother spoke about how the late artist “appreciated everything [the fans] did for him,” and that all the “love and light” meant something to Smyth in his final days.

“My brother was very excited to see a lot of you create challenges for his latest released single, #Twerkoholic part 2, while he was in the ICU,” wrote Denzil. “It really brought him a big smile to his face.” In the video, Denzil said that the family was looking into setting up a livestream or a way for fans to virtually attend the memorial in Florida so they could pay their last respects.

“So, on behalf of my brother and my family, we want to say thank you to all of you for all of your love & support throughout the years. We ask for privacy during these difficult times. We also want to say thank you for all of your prayers. #RIPBSMYTH Love you, bro!”

As the world mourns, here’s what you need to know about B. Smyth.

B. Smyth Was A R&B/Hip-Hop Musician

(Owen Sweeney/Shutterstock)

Born and raised in Florida, B. Smyth got his start by uploading his covers of popular songs to YouTube. “His smooth style drew comparisons to more grown-up acts like Chris Brown and Usher, and before long, his impressive video view counts had the teen performing at various talent showcases, eventually landing a deal with Motown in 2012,” reads his AllMusic biography.

“I started putting out YouTube covers about two and a half years ago,” B. Smyth told Complex in 2013. “I was able to develop a fan base there and ended up signing to a production company, EP Entertainment. From there, I started showcasing to record labels, and I ended up signing to Motown. I linked up with Ne-Yo after that because he’s a labelmate, and I think he’s an executive at the label.

His Legacy Was Cut Short

After signing to Motown in 2012, he released his first EP, The Florida Files. It was followed by his second ep, Thr3, in 2017. He also released a handful of singles.

He Worked With Some Big Names During His Career.

One look at B. Smyth’s discography, which contains some impressive cosigns. His first single, “Leggo,” featured 2 Chainz. It was B. Smyth’s most successful hit, reaching No. 12 on the US R&B charts and No. 20 on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles.

Smyth worked with Future (“Win Win”), Rick Ross (“Gold Wrappers”), and Young Thug (“Creep”). While they didn’t chart commercially, they helped build a fanbase for this new sensation.

He Passed Away Due To A Lung Disease

B. Smyth died battling pulmonary fibrosis, which the Mayo Clinic lists as “a lung disease that occurs when lung tissue becomes damaged and scarred. This thickened, stiff tissue makes it more difficult for your lungs to work properly. As pulmonary fibrosis worsens, you become progressively more short of breath. The lung damage caused by pulmonary fibrosis can’t be repaired, but medications and therapies can sometimes help ease symptoms and improve quality of life. For some people, a lung transplant might be appropriate.”

B. Smyth Believed In Himself

“For the most part, I’ve had two club/party records, but with this new The Florida Files EP, people get to see I’m not just a club record,” Smyth told Complex. “I’m not just a dancing guy. There’s real talent here, real music and substance that’s going to set me apart from everyone else. I sing, I dance, and I write, but I feel like my music is great, and people are going to gravitate to it. People will see I’m not just a gimmick. I’m not a gimmick.”

“I really want to get my content out and focus on getting people familiar with who I am as an artist, not relying on the feature,” he also said. “I’m definitely listening to other people, and I’m definitely inspired by other people like Drake and Kendrick Lamar, But for right now, I’m trying to focus on me.”

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