Barack Obama Confirms He Tested Positive For COVID & Is Experiencing A ‘Scratchy Throat’

The former president, 60, shared news that he tested positive for COVID-19 via Twitter on March 13. He confirmed wife Michelle Obama tested negative.

View gallery
Image Credit: Evan El-Amin/Shutterstock

Barack Obama has COVID-19. The former president, who is now 60-years-old, revealed he’s experienced a “scratchy throat” in a tweet posted to his page on Sunday, March 13. “I just tested positive for COVID. I’ve had a scratchy throat for a couple days, but am feeling fine otherwise,” he confirmed. Despite his diagnosis, wife Michelle Obama, 58, has tested negative.

“Michelle and I are grateful to be vaccinated and boosted, and she has tested negative,” he added in the tweet, signing off with a reminder about the importance of both a double vaccination and booster. “It’s a reminder to get vaccinated if you haven’t already, even as cases go down,” he added. It’s unclear where the Dreams From My Father author contracted the disease or what variation he caught, but per his tweet, it appears the results came in on March 13.

Barack Obama confirmed he tested positive for COVID-19 via Twitter. (Evan El-Amin/Shutterstock
)

Since the COVID-19 pandemic began two years ago, the Hawaii native has been vocal about following rules and restrictions — including getting vaccinated last year. “Michelle and I got vaccinated against COVID-19 because we know it’s the best way to beat this pandemic, protect one another, and get the country back up and running again,” he said on Facebook in March 2021. “So I hope you’ll get the vaccine as soon as it’s available to you. It could save your life,” he implored his followers.

So far, it’s estimated that 65.7% of Americans are fully vaccinated against the deadly virus, equating to about 217 million people. Worldwide, over 6 million people have lost their lives to COVID-19 — including over 950,000 Americans.

Michelle took to Instagram last spring to share a photo receiving her initial vaccine dose with the hopes of encouraging other Americans to do the same. “When you can get the COVID-19 vaccine, I hope you do—Barack and I are certainly glad we did,” she wrote at hte time. “It’s our best shot at beating this virus, looking out for one another, and getting back to some of the things we miss. Getting vaccinated will save lives—and that life could be yours.”

More From Our Partners