Felicity Huffman’s ‘Desperate Housewives’ Co-Star Slams Her Short Prison Sentence

Felicity Huffman receiving only 14 days in prison for pleading guilty to committing a felony isn't sitting well with one of her 'Desperate Housewives' co-stars, who says she received 'white privilege.'

Ricardo Chavira and Felicity Huffman
View gallery
Image Credit: Shutterstock

Not all of Felicity Huffman‘s former Desperate Housewives co-stars are thrilled that she escaped a possible four months in a federal prison with just a 14 day sentence. That’s what she received after pleading guilty to a felony charge for her role in the college admissions scandal where she paid for a proctor to change her daughter’s SAT scores to read 400 points higher. Ricardo Chavira, 48, who played Carlos Solis on the ABC show, says she was the recipient of “white privilege” and that he saw it happen first-hand on Housewives during the series’ 2004-2012 run.

“White Privilege. I saw eight years worth of it working on Housewives. I’ve seen a lifetime of it being a halfbreed, and I’ve struggled w the intricacies of it on a daily basis w all the cultural bias I’ve received on both ends. But whatever. Slap on the wrist. Sorry, but this sh*t,” he tweeted on Sept. 13 shortly after she received her sentence. He added, “It’s not about race. Tired of stupid people and their stupid arguments. If you haven’t lived it, you really have no say. Stay in your lane.”

Prosecutors initially asked for 56-year-old actress to spend four months in a federal prison for her role in Operation Varsity Blues. Instead she was given just 14 days in a minimum security federal prison, in addition to a 30,000 fine, 250 hours of community service and a year of supervised release. After Felicity received just two weeks in prison for pleading guilty to a felony, “white privilege” became the top trending Twitter topic.

https://twitter.com/RicardoAChavira/status/1172704584495767552

Ricardo’s on-screen wife Eva Longoria, who played Gabriella Solis, was one of 27 people to write letters of support asking the judge to give Felicity a lenient sentence. She praised her good works, especially when it came to Eva’s favorite charities. Eva said she would ask her co-stars for assistance, but they would tell her they were “usually too busy to help, except Felicity. I can’t tell you how many times she was the only one who would physically show up to help me with the kids with cancer, or children with special needs,” Eva wrote.

She also described how she was bullied by a co-star and how it was “torture” to work with that person. “Until one day, Felicity told the bully ‘enough’ and it all stopped. Felicity could feel that I was riddled with anxiety even though I never complained or mentioned the abuse to anyone,” Eva added.

More From Our Partners