‘The Heat’ Reviews: A Buddy-Cop Comedy For The Ages?

Sat, June 29, 2013 9:47am EDT by 13 Comments
The Heat Movie Reviews
Courtesy of Fox

Melissa McCarthy and Sandra Bullock teamed up for what looks to be a raucous movie about two extremely different policewomen. We’re hooked on the premise alone, but do these two ladies actually make a winning team? Find out!

Have you ever said to yourself, “Gee, I’d love to see a raunchier female version of Starsky & Hutch“? If you answered yes, then The Heat, starring Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy is probably for you. The new buddy-cop movie (in theaters on June 28) has our expectations soaring, but before we foot the bill for movie tickets, let’s see what the critics had to say!

‘The Heat’ Movie Reviews

New York Times

A simpler, and probably more relevant, way to describe this movie would be to say that it’s around two hours of Melissa McCarthy spewing profanity while Sandra Bullock cringes, flutters her arms and sighs in exasperation. If you need another reason to see it, I can’t in good conscience supply one, since the story is sloppy and thin, many of the jokes are strained or tired, and the level of violence is a bit jarring. But the volatile chemistry between Ms. McCarthy and Ms. Bullock is something to behold, and carries The Heat through its lazy conception and slapdash execution.

Los Angeles Times

The Heat, starring Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy, is the latest entry in a long-running and much-loved movie joke: the buddy-cop comedy. In this case, a bosom-buddy cop comedy. The movie follows a well-beaten path. They’re cops, they’re enemies, they’re friends, they’re opposites. It’s funny. The legacy is a long one: Beverly Hills Cop, Tango & Cash, Starsky & Hutch, 48 Hrs., Men in Black, Turner & Hooch, Miami Vice. Basically it’s a man’s world. But as director Paul Feig, screenwriter Katie Dippold and the caustic, crackling chemistry of its stars prove, “The Heat” would be nothing, nothing without a woman.

New York Post

There’s nothing remotely original or surprising about Katie Dippold’s generic script. But the script and director Paul Feig (who directed McCarthy in Bridesmaids) provide great opportunities for both actresses to do what they do best, and demonstrate their positively combustible comic chemistry.

Washington Post

Like Channing Tatum and Jamie Foxx in White House Down, Bullock and McCarthy and the chemistry they generate are far more compelling than the movie they’re in. Too often the sketches go on too long, and the coarse, abrasive tone quickly begins to feel repetitive and off-putting.

New York Magazine

The Heat is kind of a mess, but it’s a funny mess. Bullock plays Ashburn, a highly competent, by-the-books FBI agent with no life. (Her only company is a cat — her neighbor’s.) McCarthy is Mullins, the vulgar loose cannon Boston detective whom Ashburn has to work with in order to apprehend a brutal drug kingpin. It’s no Beverly Hills Cop, but The Heat does spend a decent amount of time with its cops ‘n robbers plot — bizarre, because it’s such a nothing story. So, the film sometimes feels lax, disjointed, like it’s just wasting time until the next comic set piece rolls around. The good news is that said set piece usually does roll around. And when it’s on, The Heat is on. (God, did I just say that?)

Sounds like Sandra and Melissa make a great, hilarious duo. That’s all we need to hear — sign us up! HollywoodLifers, will you go see The Heat? Let us know!

WATCH: ‘The Heat’ Trailer

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