Autism & Vaccinations: Major New Study Proves There’s No Link

Mon, May 19, 2014 3:04pm EDT by 12 Comments
Vaccinations Do Not Cause Autism
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A professor at the University of Sydney has released a brand new study that will hopefully put an end to the debate that necessary childhood vaccinations cause autism. Finally!

In 2007, Jenny McCarthy raised eyebrows and sparked controversy when she publicly declared that her son Evan‘s autism was caused by his childhood immunization shots. A dangerously large amount of parents and celebrities followed her footsteps, deciding not to vaccinate their children “just in case.” Now, a new study conducted with over one million different children from all over the world has proven that there is no connection between vaccination shots and and childhood autism. Take that, Jenny!

New Study: Autism Is Not Caused By Vaccinations

A new study released by Associate Professor Guy Eslick from the Sydney Medical School at the University of Sydney has proven that there is no connection between immunization shots and autism.

The professor watched numerous different documentaries about the controversial subject, and found that no one had ever combined all of the different studies to see the results.

What Guy found after combining over 1.25 million case studies was astonishing — not a single connection could be found between necessary childhood immunizations and autism.

“The data consistently shows the lack of evidence for an association between autism, autism spectrum disorders and childhood vaccinations … providing no reason to avoid immunization on these grounds,” the professor told the New York Post.

The data Professor Eslick speaks of consisted of information collected by seven different major studies conducted all over the world.

Professor Eslick admits that even he was surprised to find the lack of connection after seeing so much anti-vaccine propaganda.

“I want my research to elucidate the truth and find out what’s real. When I saw the data, I would have to say I was a bit surprised but happy overall.”

Prof. Eslick Concerned About Measles Outbreak

Of course, because of celebrities like Jenny McCarthy, Kristin Cavallari, and Jim Carrey, thousands of parents have been influenced not to provide their babies and children with necessary immunization shots.

After the rise of anti-vaccine activists, there have been 11 measles outbreaks in the United States since 2000. Professor Eslick also confirmed that Australia has seen a spike of measles infections starting in 2012.

Sadly, Professor Eslick does not believe this study will change the minds of those who firmly believe in anti-vaccinations. He believes they are already dead-set in their beliefs, despite any scientific report claiming otherwise.

“[This study)]will be cold comfort for them and I don’t think it will change their minds. You will probably never be able to change their minds,” he said. How sad. 

You can read Professor Eslick’s full report at ScienceDirect.com.

– Lauren Cox

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