Baby Boy Born With Two Heads: Doctors Hopeful For Conjoined Twins

Fri, July 26, 2013 10:29am EST by 2 Comments
Baby With Two Heads
Courtesy of CBS

Doctors are working hard to save the lives of conjoined twins with two heads and a shared body. Hear their unique story!

A boy with two heads was born in Rajasthan, India on July 24. Born with a rare condition called dicephalic parapagus, the boys are being given the most delicate care. The good news is that doctors believe they can save the twins’ lives!

Conjoined Twins Born In India

The boys have an extremely rare condition called Dicephalic Parapagus. Their birth actually marks only the second known case in India! This condition is more likely to occur in girls and most of the time the babies are stillborn.

“The Indian boy specifically has two separate heads, nervous systems and back bones that join at the pelvis. He only has one rib cage and shoulder girdle. More tests need to be done to see what other organs are shared or joined,” reports CBS News.

After they assess the babies’ health, doctors hope to save the twins’ lives. Since they do not have separate bodies, they will not be separated, but they may be able to still live a relatively normal life.

Famous Case Of Dicephalic Parapagus: Abigail and Brittany

Perhaps the most famous case of conjoined twins with dicephalic parapagus in America is Abigail and Brittany Hensel. The girls’ story was featured on Abby & Brittany, the TLC reality TV series. Now young adults, these girls delight in living their lives as normally as possible — and we hope the same may be true for these twin boys!

What do YOU think, HollyMoms? Are YOU pulling for the twins?

WATCH: Indian Boy Born With Two Heads

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CBS

– Kristine Hope Kowalski

More Conjoined Twins News:

  1. Formerly Conjoined Twins Thrive After Separation Surgery
  2. First Photo: Successfully Separated Conjoined Twin Baby Girls
  3. Conjoined Twins Abby & Brittany Hensel Live A Normal Life

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LissaCaldina

Posted at 12:05 PM on July 26, 2013  

not tryna be mean but...

Posted at 10:43 AM on July 26, 2013  

how many internal organs they have? you know. common case is one of them dies.

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