New Report Says: Jenny McCarthy’s Son May Not Have Had Autism After All

Fri, February 26, 2010 9:15am EST by 755 Comments
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After years of speaking out about her son’s autism — and against childhood immunizations — Jenny McCarthy is reversing her position.

After years of speaking publicly about her belief that MMR shots (immunization for measles, mumps, and rubella) caused her son to suffer from autism, Jenny McCarthy now faces the reality that her 7-year-old son Evan — who no longer shows any signs of autism — may likely have lived with completely different illness.

A new article in Time magazine — which Jenny was interviewed for — suggests Evan suffers from Landau-Kleffner syndrome, “a rare childhood neurological disorder that can also result in speech impairment and possible long-term neurological damage.”

Many applaud Jenny, who has never stopped fighting to help her son since his autism diagnosis in 2005.  Others, like the Center of Disease Control, say her claims about immunizations make her “a menace to public health.”

Jenny talks about her son’s progress saying, “Evan couldn’t talk — now he talks. Evan couldn’t make eye contact — now he makes eye contact. Evan was anti-social — now he makes friends.  It was amazing to watch … when something didn’t work for Evan, I didn’t stop. I stopped that treatment, but I didn’t stop.”

And she is also reversing her initial position that the MMR shots caused Evan’s autism.  Jenny now says she wants vaccinations better researched — rather than getting rid of them altogether, as she previously promoted.  And though her son may never have had autism, Jenny insists, “I’ll continue to be the voice” of the disorder.

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meyer

Posted at 1:49 PM on January 3, 2014  

Too bad he can’t get fake boobs like his mom no one notices her stupidity.

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Gregg

Posted at 1:49 PM on January 3, 2014  

JM is yet another brain trust from the western suburbs.

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chimeragirl2010

Posted at 12:11 PM on January 3, 2014  

It says that her son is 7 and that he was diagnosed in 2005. Hmmm….I’m no math whiz but this doesn’t add up.

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chimeragirl2010

Posted at 12:12 PM on January 3, 2014  

oops…old article. my mistake.

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guest

Posted at 11:40 AM on January 3, 2014  

Last thing, autism is a word that covers a branch of disorders. Jenny is a hopeful mother that is doing everything get her son away from the word AUTISM. I myself wanted to feel like my child doesn’t have it. Only difference. … Jenny has money! Money can get your kid the best help, which will increase the child’s ability to become more functioning.

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Christina

Posted at 1:39 PM on January 3, 2014  

Money doesnt necessarily mean everything. I don’t have money but I was an advocate for my son with school, treatments, etc. I worked with him, on whatever the speech, teachers said he needed, plus my own research. Educating yourself and not giving up, mean more than money ever will.

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guest

Posted at 11:31 AM on January 3, 2014  

Out of 13 kid’s in my family only one child doesn’t have a neurological disorder. Before the 90s, my family of aunt’s and close family ONLY had history of dyslexia. The one child that has no nneurological problems or leaning disabilities was the youngest. It was because the mother, my sister, took advice and spread out the vaccines, and refused the vaccines that had a low chance of death. Basically … the child received only shots that were given out in the 70s. When the boy is older and may travel will he get a few more. That’s the only thing done differently

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erintheoptimist

Posted at 11:51 AM on January 3, 2014  

They may have protected against the same diseases as the ones in the 70’s, but they weren’t the same vaccines. They lacked certain ingredients, carried a lower viral load, and were generally tweaked to be more effective for less risk. Of course, there’s the simple matter of genetics: even different children of the same parents have different genes from their siblings, so some may have had the disorders and others not. Furthermore, dyslexia is, like autism, a constellation of disorders rather than one specific thing. The diagnostic criteria for what was called dyslexia in the 70’s has changed dramatically, and given way to a wide variety of different learning disability diagnoses.

All of which leads me to conclude that the parents involved had some bad genetic luck: the disorder that showed up as dyslexia in the parent generation showed up as a bunch of other (related) things in the children. The youngest was the one who won his family’s genetic lottery and didn’t get those genes. Vaccines had nothing to do with it.

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Pete Davis

Posted at 11:55 AM on January 3, 2014  

Correlation is not causation. 200 years of science (the first smallpox vaccine was 1796) says you’re absolutely wrong about the cause. The fact that 12 out of 13 kids had neurological problems points unavoidably at either a genetic defect in the parent (most likely) or possibly something environmental. But if it were the vaccinations that caused it in 12 out of 13 kids, it would be causing it in 90% of the other kids out there too.

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Cerulean

Posted at 8:32 AM on January 3, 2014  

Ha, “better researched.” This deadly airhead. She has to cling to the possibility that she was right somehow, so she points at a well-tested invention that’s been serving us for most of a century and implies that the problem must be that its mysteries are still unexamined. That’s on the level of claiming “nobody really knows” how a television works.

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Sissi Wedgwood

Posted at 8:32 AM on December 10, 2013  

I always suspected her son didn’t have autism.

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mharvey816

Posted at 3:49 PM on October 21, 2013  

Reblogged this on mharvey816 and commented:
Is anyone surprised by this?

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Kelly M. Bray

Posted at 10:53 PM on October 23, 2013  

Nope, not a bit.

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imzogh

Posted at 12:04 AM on October 21, 2013  

CONTINUE? She is oblivious to the fact they don’t want her NEAR them, as it would be like having Micheal Vick as a spokesman for the Humane Society!

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grafactor

Posted at 2:30 PM on October 20, 2013  

“Many applaud Jenny, who has never stopped fighting to help her son since his autism diagnosis in 2005. Others, like the Center of Disease Control, say….”

You make it sound like there are two sides to this “debate”. You guys in the media have to got to stop doing that.

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Julie

Posted at 4:39 PM on September 29, 2013  

First of all, I have to see the article to see if she says this or if this is speculation ABOUT her and Evan. I cannot access the article in Time as I don’t have a subscription, so I can only address what I have available. First of all, Jenny has been doing a lot of things outside of Autism, so when she says that “she will still be a spokesperson for autism” could very well mean that she still is, even though Evan is doing so well and they can have a normal-ish life again.
Secondly, Landau Kleffner syndrome appears to be rare, so even if Evan was misdiagnosed, it is apparently easy to do considering the similarities (look it up, you’ll see this stated in many places.) Most doctors will go to the most obvious diagnosis until proven to be something else. So yes, easy to misdiagnose.
Thirdly, Jenny has never been against vaccines. If she was, she would never have done the “Green Our Vaccines” rallies. Any person who is willing to take the time to research this would know that her position has not changed.
Lastly, for those who say Evan never had Autism based solely on the fact that he is doing so well now is making a huge error. If someone had an obvious tumor that tested malignant one month and then appears to be gone months later, does that mean the person never had cancer to begin with? Or do we acknowledge that it was in fact there but somehow has healed? I personally know children who have almost or fully recovered from “Autism” after the parents tried numerous therapies to help their kids. It is possible, but each child is different and there are many causations of “Autism-like symptoms.” I have a daughter with Autism and Down Syndrome, and I will tell you that the school professionals will “blame” the work I do with my daughter for her gains. Some gains are possibly just maturation, sure. But others are clearly due to dietary or supplement changes I have made. When my daughter feels better, some of the “autism symptoms” go away. That, and lots of love and acceptance of who she is and where she’s at.

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Kelly M. Bray

Posted at 10:54 PM on October 23, 2013  

Spin, spin, spin, she is an ignorant menace to society.

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Shelly

Posted at 5:21 PM on November 20, 2013  

You are rude and mean! Why do you have to talk like that! Dumb remarks!

 
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Max D. Wyght (@MaxWyght)

Posted at 8:16 AM on January 3, 2014  

Right you are :)

 
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cake eclipse

Posted at 8:17 AM on August 22, 2013  

thats not true my son is autistic and i worked with him every waking hour from age 1 to present and he only has small quirks. he can speak and he does make eye contact. so that has nothing to do with it if you work hard with them and dont give up you can progress. just last spring my son made it across the fence to play in the neighbors yard. he may not fully interact with the kids yet but it is a huge step

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just-saying

Posted at 10:06 PM on August 13, 2013  

And though her son may never have had autism, Jenny insists, “I’ll continue to be the voice” of the disorder…

Really? No thank you. I think we can do just fine without your nonsense. Best wishes to you and your son and good riddance.

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millie

Posted at 2:47 PM on July 29, 2013  

If you believe that this story is true I would like to sell you all some swamp land.

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little_bitter_one

Posted at 8:18 AM on August 10, 2013  

Why is it so hard for you to believe that one doctor could actually be wrong, Millie? Doctors disagree with one another all of the time, so clearly, one or more of them would be wrong in a debate over the correct diagnosis. They’re still human (even if many of them think of themselves as superhuman).

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Heather White

Posted at 11:12 PM on July 28, 2013  

This is all about the *total* environmental toxic our children face today. Exposures to aluminum, mercury, fetal and other foreign protein, foreign DNA including fetal, money, chicken, and other DNA, stealth viruses, Polysorbate 80, formaldehyde, gentamycin and have gastrointestinal, neurological/psychiatric disorders and chronic pain at a rate which has increased by 831% in a 7 year period (Coffelt et al, 2013). This is not just about autism in the pediatric population this is about the epidemics of chronic disease like IDDM, Cancer, Asthma, Crohn’s, GBS, Lupus, Mito etc….!!!

I believe it is long past high time to stop protecting a cherished article of faith (that vaccines are both safe and effective) and look at the reality, not the pharmaceutical propaganda science. Vaccines need to be seen for precisely what they are no matter how beloved they are in our medical culture.

Perhaps they do not deserve that affection, although they provide so many jobs and so much wealth for so many workers and corporations which are, by the way, protected from any meaningful threat of liability for negligence or tort by special legislation paid for by the vaccine recipients. The Special Masters Vaccine Court dispenses a tiny portion of this money in compensation for vaccine damages to a tiny portion of children so injured or killed, yet more than $2 Billion U.S. has already been dispensed by the Special Masters to the families of these dead and damaged children.

Jenny may or may not give her *full* opinion on the View but we in society will certainly have our say!

Coffelt et al. (2013). Inpatient Characteristics of the Child Admitted With Chronic Pain. PEDIATRICS. doi:10.1542/peds.2012-1739

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Marsha

Posted at 1:02 PM on July 29, 2013  

Good & sincere comment, Heather. Thanks to you & many like you the real truth is finally getting out. That will be what saves many children from the same fate too many have already met with. The ingredients alone on the vaccine inserts should be enough to scare any sane parent enough to clue them much research is needed. But these inserts are never offered by doctors. Ask any parent if anyone reading this doesn’t believe this. Why is that do you think?

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J. Myers

Posted at 1:46 PM on August 13, 2013  

“The real truth is finally getting out?” OMG! All inserts should be available if you want to see them, and I am surprised that you were not shown them when you were asked for consent. Perhaps your pediatrician sucks???

As for the ingredients… I’m going to go out on a limb and guess that you know squat about science and medicine. Our lives and the things we consume are made up of chemicals, additive compounds, and sometimes other organic materials. Yes, the ingredients *sound scary*, but so does the content of a hot dog. How about you learn the purpose of each ingredient, and not over-react to the words. If we could somehow culture cell lines without biological materials we would do it, but for now sometimes the cells have to come from chicken eggs or mouse ovaries.

 
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J. Myers

Posted at 1:30 PM on August 13, 2013  

Heather, I am sorry for whatever pain you have had to endure in your life. Your notion that somehow vaccines are evil and are supported by a conspiracy of people whose mission statement must be “We are going to make as much money as we can by making children sick.” is so misguided that I do not know where to even begin. I could point out that vaccines account for less than 2% of the pharmaceutical market or the statistics on the virtual eradication of diseases such as pertussis, polio, rubella, etc., but I doubt you would listen. You are clueless, and I suspect you have no desire to learn anything as you will undoubtedly chalk me up as a shill for big pharma. I can only pray that your ignorance and your influence on others does not result in the deaths of children at the hands of preventable disease.

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Heather White

Posted at 1:38 PM on August 13, 2013  

I only pray that our ignorance and your influence on others does not result in the promotion of chronic disease epidemics that our children are struggling with today.

 
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psbintl

Posted at 3:56 PM on August 13, 2013  

J. Myers,

I have to agree with you wholeheartedly! It is very clear Marsha and Heather are completely ignorant of both science and medicine and have absolutely NO idea the millions of children both here in the US and world wide whose lives have been saved from contracting horrible communicable disease by the benefit of vaccinations. Such a pity they spread their anti-vaccine vitriol around with absolutely no medical or science basis!!

 
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Leona

Posted at 11:00 AM on August 24, 2013  

This is a spot on comment, J. It makes me sad to see so many ignorant people happy to wallow in junk science at the expense of public health.

 
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Sheri

Posted at 7:28 PM on October 17, 2013  

Imagine you start out with a beautiful child so full of laughter and personality that develops normally from birth. You have no reason to suspect anything wrong. Then between 2 and 3 when they are given these questionable vaccines, your child withdraws from you, doesn’t respond to their name, doesn’t seem to understand you when you talk to them or even acknowledge that you even said anything to them. Until you see this happen to your own child, you can’t understand the reality of this happening to any child. I too was skeptical after my son’s diagnosis of Autism that vaccines could be a cause, but as I started doing more research just so many things started adding up and pointing in that direction. I was given 2 flu shots while pregnant with him. I even questioned the second flu shot and they said it was perfectly safe. I have now asked many people about this and it is unheard of for a pregnant woman to get 2 flu shots. I had another baby within 13 months with another doctor. I didn’t even receive a flu shot at all and that child does not have Autism. I have four children and only one with Autism. He has had a chromosome test done and it came back normal. This was not genetically caused. So my point is, until this happens to your child you cannot understand the depths at which these parents have researched about Autism. In fact, these parents may even know more about Autism than most doctors. My son’s pediatrician has never been able to answer any of my questions about Autism. I have gotten more answers from other parents and research than I have from any doctor.

 
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Wona

Posted at 3:08 PM on September 13, 2013  

ABSOLUTELY Heather White….well said…
If people do not wake up soon and listen to the parents that are currently all over these problems and have found out the truth behind the BS ,instead of believing everything the media manipulates us to believe…there will only be a percentage of the human race left..and guess what ?, it wont be the percentage they ( the media lies believers ) are in.!!

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Rachel

Posted at 10:57 AM on October 20, 2013  

You do realize the man who founded the Polio vaccine never patented it, meaning it could be affordable to everyone. Which means he lost billions of dollars so millions of kids would never have to deal with Polio, and later in life, Post Polio Syndrome; which my uncle died of. And if you’re so dead set against vaccines, you shouldn’t support March of Dimes, which was first created by FDR to help support funding for a vaccine for Polio.

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aharris

Posted at 9:20 AM on October 28, 2013  

Do you actually know anyone who works in the industry and on a level where they understand the science behind the makeup of these things? I do. I’m married to him. My husband works with these things every day. He’s had well over 100 different vaccinations in his life just to hold his job. He sees the results of all the testing that is done. He is intimately acquainted with the vaccines and their risks.

He would never, ever ask either I or our son to do anything that he thinks would be a serious risk to our health in the face of what we might be facing if we did not get vaccinated. All of his coworkers are the same with their families.

In their estimation, the risk of adverse reaction is worth being protected against measles and mumps and polio while maybe not worth the risk of a slightly higher chance of not getting the yearly flu, for example.

It all comes down to a game of risk v. reward. Every biological being is an individual and no matter what we are talking about, it will never be safe enough to not react badly with some individuals. So you are weighing the chance of a bad reaction against the chances of infection and what that infection could cost you. Most of us live under a feeling of false security provided by the number of people who are vaccinated. Go walk through an old cemetery sometime and look at all the gravestones marking the graves of babies. Most of them died because they caught the things we can vaccinate against today. Understand that with the increasing number of immigrants and the breakdown of any coherent policy to check them before letting them in, more and more of these diseases we haven’t seen in this country for a long time are simply going to talk across our border.

There will be tiny graves again.

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Heather White

Posted at 9:29 AM on October 28, 2013  

Fearmongering….

There was a 90% reduction in infectious disease mortality prior to 1940 ~ before the widespread use of vaccination and antibiotics.

Over 50% of the pediatric population is now diagnosed with a chronic disease, infant mortality rates continue to worsen in the U.S.

Your vaccine religion is blinding you to the ongoing suffering of our children.

 
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Elise Telesco

Posted at 10:31 PM on July 28, 2013  

Mercury and other toxic ingredients are still present> Believe what gets you to sleep at night. Being tested and overloaded with heavy metals might have one re-think the issue. If a mother was tested and found to be on an overload of heavy metals maybe it might not be a good idea to overload her infant with more toxic ingredients. Maybe. Maybe someday I will conduct my own study . ooops I already did two unvaccinated adults Never any vacccines or medications what so ever. While I have been tested several times and still overloaded with Mercury I choose not to add to the issue with my kids.

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Bob Kauten

Posted at 2:52 PM on October 20, 2013  

Elise,
Who, exactly, tested you for mercury overload? Let me guess. A chiropractor, or a holistic “doctor”? Charlatans.
How in the world would you get a mercury overload? Eating toxic waste?

You are totally selfish, in not getting vaccinated. You are depending on everyone else around you to be immune to disease, because they are vaccinated. Look up “herd immunity.”
Had polio lately? Kids got polio quite frequently, until Salk vaccine was invented. Polio abruptly stopped. Not coincidence. Not an increase in hygiene. Vaccine did it. I was there when polio ended. It’s still a problem in societies that don’t allow vaccination.

Smallpox, as far as we know, is gone. Vaccination. Anyone traveling outside the U.S.A. was required to get a smallpox vaccination. Not anymore.

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Richard Diaz

Posted at 5:05 PM on July 28, 2013  

Landau-Kleffner syndrome is a disease with no identified cause and/or no prescribed cure. That’s why it’s named after two doctors. It’s a clinical Dx. There is not biological test to identify its existence. Jenny McCarthy has been right, correct and brilliant all along. The medical profession is the source of mis-information in this case and many more.

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Michelle Johnson

Posted at 4:35 PM on July 28, 2013  

My daughter has Asperger’s. My ex husband and her half brother have Asperger’s. The family has also said one of his great uncles had a fascination with trains and was eccentric so there is definitely a genetic component involved.

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Christina Waldman

Posted at 4:11 PM on July 31, 2013  

Genes can be damaged by environmental toxic exposure, and the mutations transmitted genetically. E.g., fungicide with mercury in it used to be used on crops for many years. Mercury, such as that still used in some vaccine preservatives as thimerosal, damages cell mitochondria. There are so many opportunities for our genes to be damaged in our toxic world, but injecting toxin directly into the bloodstream of helpless children is certainly suspect. Vaccines in the law are “unavoidably unsafe,” contrary to the media campaign to rehabilitate their reputation by our government, big Pharma, and brainwashed doctors. Vaccines are a high profit item these days; why not? There is no industry liability. See the National Vaccine Information Center, nvic.com.

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J. Myers

Posted at 1:51 PM on August 13, 2013  

Christina, vaccines are a very low margin product. Less than 2% of (evil) Big Pharma’s revenue comes from vaccines. As for thimerosol, it was phased out of almost all vaccines in the 90’s. It now only appears in some flu shots.

 
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Misty

Posted at 12:51 PM on July 28, 2013  

If vaccines caused autism, either from old harmful ingredients or the new more intense schedule, then why are their people on the spectrum at every age? Some people wanted to blame mercury. Well, they have nearly eliminated mercury from vaccines and yet the numbers continue to rise. Some wanted to blame the more intensive vaccination schedule. Then why are their people with autism who are well into adulthood who didn’t go through such a rigorous vaccination schedule? I absolutely think that vaccines should be made to be as safe as is possible. But how much money, time, and resources have we wasted looking for a link between vaccines and autism when over and over it is proven that one doesn’t exist. Money that could have been used supporting those currently dealing with a diagnosis or looking at other possible causes. And as a mother of a child on the spectrum just it me say that I do not question for one second that she was born this way. We noticed early warning signs VERY early on. As early as maybe 5 months old. And also, let me just say, that while autism can be difficult and hard to handle for any family, it is not in and of itself fatal. No one is going to die just from having autism. Are there incidental behaviors that can be dangerous like wandering, sure. But autism itself isn’t fatal. Measles, pertussis, and polio sure can be. And I for one would much rather my child be alive than to know that I didn’t protect my child from a fully preventable disease and they died.

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PB

Posted at 1:36 PM on July 28, 2013  

Bravo post! My grandson is autistic and we are all in the medical field in our family, including his mother (my daughter) and never once would we ever entertain him not being fully protected with vaccinations. Jenny McCarthy’s stance against immunizations put not only her son’s life in danger but many others too who she influenced and who were around her son. I am sick peopl with no knowledge of what they are talking about spewing nonsensical rhetoric as if they are experts on a subject, when clearly they are not!

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DB

Posted at 6:15 PM on July 29, 2013  

Good comments. It worries me that people would much rather believe celebrities, with no formal training or expertise in the field, over doctors and scientists, who have worked hard and tirelessly for many years to bring this level of medial care to us all. It also worries me that people would rather put their children in danger by not getting them vaccinated. Because instead of researching into how vaccines have been created and how they have drastically lowered or totally eradicated once lethal childhood illnesses, they’d much rather listen to media scare stories. But, you don’t get support from the runaway public or sell papers full of opinions (not facts) and misinformation by appealing to a human beings rational side. To gain support to push your agenda you must appeal to the emotional side.

 
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heather

Posted at 11:02 AM on July 28, 2013  

I never believed that vaccinations were the reason autisim started. It is just said for all these children and babies who didn’t get vaccinated the danger they are in and started for everyone. These diseases were almost wiped out, and now have a high chance to come back again. unbelieveable.

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PB

Posted at 1:39 PM on July 28, 2013  

Absolutely true! Whooping cough is back on the rise thanks to these idiot parents who won’t have their children immunized! They are allowed to have their children mingle with other children in the various school systems and no one cares about the children who are being exposed. It enrages me!

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cleanwatersheridan

Posted at 11:19 PM on July 28, 2013  

Wrong the whooping cough vaccine is a failure ~ check the STATs 80+% disease occurance is in the fully vaccinated.

 
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Melanie Nichols

Posted at 10:43 AM on July 28, 2013  

She is an idiot. My son was BORN with autism almost 10 years ago, like every other true autistic. It has been proven that the whole vaccine scare was a crock, and still people want to believe this kind of BS… When her book first came out, someone gave me a copy. I knew then that she was wrong, and her unfounded opinions would create hysteria for years, but come on! VACCINES DO NOT CAUSE AUTISM!!!!

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Joshua

Posted at 11:38 AM on July 28, 2013  

You should research vaccines a little more before you say it’s a crock. Your statement is uneducated and the CDC itself just released a statement that over 98 million americans received vaccinations that have cancer causing agents. Furthermore that the spread of HIV was given through vaccinations as well. I’m not hating on you but I’m asking you to research a little more before you state that it’s a crock….

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PB

Posted at 1:41 PM on July 28, 2013  

Vaccines DO NOT CAUSE AUTISM! That is the point here and the subject of THIS forum!

 
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cleanwatersheridan

Posted at 11:22 PM on July 28, 2013  

I personally don’t like calling it autism ~ my son is brain damaged due to vaccination and happens to also have an autism diagnosis because his brain injury affects his language and sensory integration.

We had a functional diagnostic test that found the injury, his medical history is that of well visits… i.e. vaccinations.

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Me

Posted at 7:12 AM on July 28, 2013  

Hey, a girl’s gotta eat, right? I understand her wanting to change her image. Shame for the movement that demands big pharma’s responsibility in injuring so many.

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Marsha

Posted at 2:19 AM on July 28, 2013  

It is what it is & her son, like so many, were vaccine injured. It should not even become called autism. That name is not appropriate for the wide rage of neurological & gut disorders vaccines are known to cause. The cat is wayyyyy out of the bag & not going back in.

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Melanie Nichols

Posted at 10:44 AM on July 28, 2013  

Vaccines do not cause autism… Do your research.

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Marsha

Posted at 5:53 PM on July 28, 2013  

I did Melanie & so should you!

 
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Lowell Hubbs

Posted at 7:41 PM on August 4, 2013  

1 in 50 have ASD, the new CDC figures. So you tell me if it is not vaccines, then what is it?

 
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Lorena

Posted at 7:46 AM on August 11, 2013  

u need to do your research. Investigate about SECONDARY mitochondria and u will see it happens after vaccinations. There are PLENTY of studies. Go and LEARN about what happened 70 yrs ago. U have not idea.

 
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Robert Webb

Posted at 8:12 AM on January 3, 2014  

The whole vaccines-cause-autism thing is based on a very small study by Andrew Wakefield. Very few cases (12 from memory), self-selected (not random), and subsequent large-scale studies have found no connection. Wakefield’s paper was later redacted when it was found that he faked some of his data. He said in all 12 cases that symptoms of autism came on within 2 weeks of the vaccine, whereas in reality some started months later, or even BEFORE the vaccine. Why would he fake it? Because he had a patent on an alternative vaccine which he wanted to market, and because a lawyer paid him to do his study and find that result. But once you put an idea like this out there, it’s hard to get rid of. Autism symptoms generally start around the age of 2, which is also the age when many vaccines are given, so if a child shows signs of autism, it will often be around the time of the vaccine. Parents with such an emotional response to the situation, looking for someone to blame, will inevitably keep thinking it must have been the vaccine. There was one country (Denmark maybe?) which keeps amazing medical records of their citizens, and they were able to use this to look at a huge number of cases across the whole population. Result: same percentage of cases of autism among the vaccinated and unvaccinated population. There are answers to all the other vaccine concerns (eg mercury was touted as a huge evil, but it all depends on dose, and vaccines have way below the safe level. You get more mercury eating a tuna sandwich, and when they removed mercury from vaccines in the US to quell irrational public fear, there was no change in autism rates).

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elnigma

Posted at 7:00 PM on July 27, 2013  

Because idiots listening to Jenny McCarthy didn’t get immunized, 100,000 people got sick or dead because people didn’t get vaccinated. She’s kind of responsible for their pain, suffering, or death. She’s nothing.

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David Edge

Posted at 6:28 PM on July 27, 2013  

As an autistic, and over 50 I certainly don’t consider my neurological condition to be a disorder. I think faster than the norms do, I am creative, and I like it that way. So what if I have a higher percentage of white matter in my brain than a normal does? That’s THEIR problem, not mine. McCarthy can stick it, and that’s been the opinion of EVERY single autistic that I’ve ever known. We don’t want a cure, sod off.

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PB

Posted at 1:45 PM on July 28, 2013  

BRAVO! I am with you 100%! My grandson is autistic, five years old and a computer genious since he was two years old! The brain of a person with autism may be wired differently but it is NOT disabled! Sure, he has some socializations issues, tends to have some behavior responses if he gets too much stimulation, etc, but there is not a thing he does not understand for someone his age and he is loving a pleasure! Kudos to you!

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Holly Robinson Peete FAN

Posted at 3:07 AM on August 11, 2013  

Jenny McCarthy has committed one of the biggest frauds ever perpetrated on US citizens. She lied about her son’s alleged autism. She conned naive publishers about her son being “autistic.” She used her celebrity status to manipulate doctors to say her son had autism when in fact many doctors said, no, he doesn’t have autism but rather another syndrome that is rooted in epilepsy and when treated with proper epilepsy meds , the kid recovers just like her kids did….OOOPPS so much for publishers vetting her kids’ diagnosis. How interesting is it that Jenny McCarthy NEVER talks about her son’s alleged autism because now that she’s milked it for everything she could, it’s an old issue and she’s on to new manipulations on how to make money and fame on TV without the slightest regard about talking about her son’s so called autism. Well, let me tell you a reality check. If you have a child with REAL autism it doesn’t end after you do a few talk shows and write a few books. You are a fraud Jenny McCarthy! A total FRAUD. God bless your son, but he does NOT Have AUTISM> He never did and you know it.

 
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Barbara Biegaj

Posted at 4:55 PM on December 12, 2013  

And all the children who are not Aspie/Suvant should suffer in silence?
Please pray for all these children who are suffering and in pain,

 
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Barbara Biegaj

Posted at 4:50 PM on December 12, 2013  

So you are like Sheldon on the Big Bang Theory,It could have gone either way when the brain is involved. Consider yourself lucky for being a HIGH FUNCTIONING ASPIE/SUVANT and pray hard for all the victims who do not have any of the abilities you are blessed with .My 14 year old son is so autistic he does need a cure.

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ellen

Posted at 2:35 AM on December 17, 2013  

While Jenny McCarthy’s son did have seizures, he does not have autism. Big difference. His diagnosis is Landau Kleffner Sydrome which when treated with anti seizure meds, improves. It has nothing to do with vaccines, vitamins, or gluten free diets. What I find most interesting about McCarthy’s case is that within a few years of her son’s alleged “autism” diagnosis, she had already written several books, did magazine interviews and TV talk shows stints, talking about her son’s alleged “autism.” She relied on the media’s ignorance and ambiguity of autism to propel her books and agenda. How sad. Nobody with a truly autistic child suddenly stops trying to help their autistic child. She went on to other things right away, as if her son’ autism was a thing of the past. It doesn’t work that way people. If your child has REAL autism, things just don’t magically get better and you don’t just suddenly stop talking about it and jump into promoting your “career”. Her son has Landau Kleffner Syndrome,which doesn’t carry the same media frenzy attention as the autism diagnosis. She is a very manipulative person who knew exactly what to do to get her situation into the media and then dumped the entire autism diagnosis by claiming her son was now “cured” and well, it’s time for her to move on. Such a SHAM> Vaccines don’t cause autism, though there is no doubt some vaccinations do harm some kids, but for McCarthy to use this as a reason to promote her son’s alleged autism is just so wrong. So wrong. Real autism is rooted in genetics and neurological and neotransmitter dysregulation. Her son had Landau Kleffner Syndrome which explains why he “recovered” after he got seizure medications. Truly autistic children with epilepsy don’t “recover” from autism after seizure meds, they only see a reduction in seizures.

 
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