New Report Says: Jenny McCarthy’s Son May Not Have Had Autism After All

Fri, February 26, 2010 9:15am EDT by 755 Comments 12,900 Article Views
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After years of speaking out about her son’s autism — and against childhood immunizations — Jenny McCarthy is reversing her position.

After years of speaking publicly about her belief that MMR shots (immunization for measles, mumps, and rubella) caused her son to suffer from autism, Jenny McCarthy now faces the reality that her 7-year-old son Evan — who no longer shows any signs of autism — may likely have lived with completely different illness.

A new article in Time magazine — which Jenny was interviewed for — suggests Evan suffers from Landau-Kleffner syndrome, “a rare childhood neurological disorder that can also result in speech impairment and possible long-term neurological damage.”

Many applaud Jenny, who has never stopped fighting to help her son since his autism diagnosis in 2005.  Others, like the Center of Disease Control, say her claims about immunizations make her “a menace to public health.”

Jenny talks about her son’s progress saying, “Evan couldn’t talk — now he talks. Evan couldn’t make eye contact — now he makes eye contact. Evan was anti-social — now he makes friends.  It was amazing to watch … when something didn’t work for Evan, I didn’t stop. I stopped that treatment, but I didn’t stop.”

And she is also reversing her initial position that the MMR shots caused Evan’s autism.  Jenny now says she wants vaccinations better researched — rather than getting rid of them altogether, as she previously promoted.  And though her son may never have had autism, Jenny insists, “I’ll continue to be the voice” of the disorder.

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LizP

Posted at 12:24 PM on January 5, 2014  

We (the community, working hard to recover our children’s health from the worst of Autism), welcomed Jenny into our fold a number of years ago. Jenny was not the first to follow the biomedical tenets, which allow our children pain-free bellies, and a clear brain; nor is she the first to embark on effective therapies, once her child felt better, with excellent results. Jenny’s son may or may not have Landau Kleffner Syndrome (my daughter does); this has no bearing on whether he once exhibited more signs of Autism and now exhibits fewer. “Autism” is no more then a bunch of symptoms, which combined, check enough boxes on a form to allow the individual to be put into a group of people with similar symptoms. “Recovering” from these symptoms does not mean you are a different person – it means you feel better and can function more similarly to the mainstream. Some are more able to hide their remaining symptoms from public view – these people are considered “recovered;” as far as I can tell, “recovered” is a relative term, not an absolute. Ultimately, my daughter does not have “Autism;” my daughter suffered from a neurobiologic injury (vaccines at 3.5 months of age, which resulted in symptoms so severe, within days, she required Emergency Department care), which left her brain injured, resulted in hippocampal sclerosis, frontal and temporal epilepsy, gastrointestinal tract mucosa decimated, retinas impaired, mitochondria starving, her muscles wasting, her development impaired, and her ability to effectively discard waste metabolites and environmental toxins impaired. The resulting symptoms caused mainstream practitioners to label her symptoms “Autism,” because they are too complex and diverse for a generalist to synthesize or treat…She is overcoming many of her symptoms, but the underlying physiology has been irreparably harmed; she will likely always have the symptoms of her “Autism,” just to a lesser degree, with the appropriate intensive nutritional, therapeutic, and medical interventions…People need to step-off, Jenny’s experience mirrors the experiences of hundreds of thousands of American families – just because your child appears OK, this is not a guarantee that the next vaccine administered will not cause harm (or that it will).

What research tells us, is that vaccines are known as “unavoidably unsafe” medical products – see Comment K, as referenced in the legislation creating the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. If these products were proven perfectly safe, there would be no need for this no-fault legislation to exist; it exists to completely insulate PhRMA from any and all liability for the harm caused by their poorly designed and despicably un-improved, on-going experimantal and poorly tested or understood products…Products which are known to impact a small subgroup of individuals with less common genetic variations in a severe (and sometimes life-ending) manner.

For those citizens with poor ability to methylate and/or limited ability to produce cellular energy, receipt of these vacciones, without proper therapeutic support, can and does result in permanent injury or death. Until TESTING is performed PRIOR to the administration of these one-size-certainly-DOESN’T-fit-all “unavoidably unsafe” medical products is truly a crap-shoot – and the health and welfare of our youngest citizens is our thoughtless “all-in” wager.

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hmariehicks

Posted at 4:15 PM on January 5, 2014  

Thank you!

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smokeytoes

Posted at 6:19 PM on January 5, 2014  

LizP,
There is a difference between protecting and nurturing your child, and engaging in reckless behavior that endangers your child and the health of others, in particular, other children, the elderly and immunocompromised.

When something (seen or unseen) threatens a child, many people do not use their better judgement, and instead go with their ‘gut’, which is no substitute for hard science but instead is emotional and irrational.

Jenny is an entertainer, she is neither a doctor nor an immunologist, she has no background in chemistry, biology, or micro-biology, pharmacology, she has zero experience working in a laboratory analyzing data and I’m positive she has far less experience writing/publishing the results of her work to be evaluated by her peers, who would be other physicians, researchers and scientists in the medical community.

The fact remains: more lives have been saved through vaccination and herd immunity than thru the anti-vax crowd.

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Elise

Posted at 10:02 AM on January 5, 2014  

Let me make this as clear as possible: Jenny McCarthy is an ENTERTAINER. She is NOT a doctor, she is NOT an immunologist, she has NO background in chemistry, she has NO background in biology, she has NO background in micro-biology, she has ZERO experience in any laboratory.

It amazes me that adults would actually take any of her comments seriously. If you want real information, try reading the New England Journal of Medicine or the multitude of medical journals that were written by people who have dedicated their entire lives to medicine.

To repeat, Jenny McCarthy is an ENTERTAINER !!!!

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mary

Posted at 8:34 AM on January 5, 2014  

Why is this now coming up on my facebook with negative comments about Jenny McCarthy, She fought for her child and other children. She made mothers aware that processed foods do affect a child’s neuro system. She didn’t sit at home improve her child’s diet and shut up she announced what she was doing and the progress she made. You imagine yourself as that young mother making those trips to MD, therapy and psych visits. Imagine her fair. She worked with her son and maybe it helped ease her panic to explode her ideas to the public. I salute her and I am a mother, grandmother and great grandmother.

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Katie

Posted at 1:53 AM on January 5, 2014  

I cannot possibly read all the comments below, but I am sure they are riveting. We had our son immunized. I know someone with polio and I don’t want my son getting polio, measles, mumps, or even the flu. So he gets shots. BUT Jenny struck upon something primal in us… our need to protect our children. Autism is such a challenge, and to think for even a second that you could avoid it, just by avoiding a shot must have sounded wonderful to the overly tired and internet savvy mother circa 2006. I won’t judge anyone. But where was the medical community in all this? Why didn’t they rally up Rob Lowe or someone cute to tell all the mothers that “Your child’s health is in your hands. Don’t listen to any Hollywood celebrity about matters of medicine. Speak with your child’s DR.” Where was the other side’s voice? I don’t blame Jenny. I just wish that she had sat down with medical professionals first. It might also be smart to remember we would all be kissing her feet if she had been right.

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erintheoptimist

Posted at 6:51 AM on January 5, 2014  

The other side missed the publicity boat, I’ll admit. That’s partly because they were off doing the follow-up studies to find out if Andrew Wakefield was right, and what they discovered was that he was completely wrong – not a single study backed up his conclusions.

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Martha

Posted at 9:58 PM on January 4, 2014  

Jenny was never against the vaccines themselves, she was/is against the toxins that are in the vaccines. Autism can exist at the same time as other disorders in a single child.

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Raymond G. Whitham

Posted at 7:18 PM on January 4, 2014  

“And she is also reversing her initial position that the MMR shots caused Evan’s autism. Jenny now says she wants vaccinations better researched……”

So she has never had any medical or scientific education and makes a false claim about vaccinations so now she is an “expert”???????

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Martha

Posted at 10:07 PM on January 4, 2014  

Jenny has said all along that she is not anti-vaccinations, she is concerned, as well as countless others, about the toxins in the vaccines, the heavy metals, etc. They cause damage to developing brains and nervous systems. So yes, the vaccines need to be better researched. The vaccines are not safe for all, some kids can handle them, some can’t. The medical community seems to think its a one size fits all deal. Its not.

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coolzog

Posted at 12:50 AM on January 5, 2014  

lol, there’s more heavy metals in a can of tuna than in any vaccine. Or you know, we could use preservative free vaccines that may contain contaminants, bacteria etc. Does that sound safer?

 
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Elise

Posted at 10:18 AM on January 5, 2014  

And where exactly did you get this rubbish from? Did you see her on a talk show and now you think she’s an expert? SHE IS AN ENTERTAINER.

 
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ME

Posted at 2:47 PM on January 6, 2014  

Coolzog. Why don’t you go some of your own research before commenting so blindly on such topics. In fact go to the CDC website and look up the list of ingredients on these vaccines. Just to name a couple things in the MMR vaccine. There is Green Monkey Tissue, Aborted Fetal Tissue ohh. And Mercury. Amd lets not forget the bacteria known as measals mumps and ruebella that are also put in the antivirus serum. But hey, There aren’t any bacteria in those things now are there?

 
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Vee

Posted at 6:50 PM on January 4, 2014  

All the people who have blindly accepted this false article as fact, are the same people who blindly accept the hype that vaccines are completely safe. You’ve proven you’re too lazy to research the facts on both counts. The truth is out there – LOOK FOR IT instead of complacently accepting that which you are being told by those whose are making a ton of money from your laziness. Your children’s health is worth the effort, surely.

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Raymond G. Whitham

Posted at 7:25 PM on January 4, 2014  

So you never question an uneducated model when she lies about science but you question the expertise of world-wide renowned infectious disease experts of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. No, it is you who is misinformed and stupid enough to believe anything she says about vaccinations. BTW, I am a communicable disease epidemiologist with and MD and a DVM. I don’t have to rely on a model’s views on science to know what I am talking about.

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Larry Klutz

Posted at 11:17 AM on January 5, 2014  

That’s an, not and!

 
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smokeytoes

Posted at 6:25 PM on January 5, 2014  

Excellent point Raymond.
Apparently, peer-reviewed data and hard science mean nothing! Next on Jenny’s to-do list is developing a cold fusion reactor. ;)

 
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Winifred

Posted at 7:45 PM on January 4, 2014  

Both of my inlaws are doctors. They have spent their lives educating themselves and practicing medicine. They insist on vaccinations for their grandchild. I trust them because they have the education to back up their words, unlike you. I will not let an unvaccinated child in my home while I am pregnant. Some of you idiots seem to think its ok to risk not only your own child’s life but mine as well.

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drew

Posted at 9:27 PM on January 4, 2014  

And you’re the one blindly accepting Jenny McCarthy’s hot air… Please, take your own ad ice and read the research done with peer review and controlled environments. Not the ones done by someone randomly screaming about something they made up.

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erintheoptimist

Posted at 9:57 PM on January 4, 2014  

Whether the article is true or not really doesn’t matter to me. What does matter is that millions of people have participated in thousands of studies administered by national institutes of health in countries all over the world, ALL OF WHICH have come to the conclusion that vaccines are essentially safe. There are rare instances of reactions, along the level of one in a hundred thousand, but the rates of death and disability from vaccines are outweighed a thousand to one by the rates of death and disability from the diseases themselves. My children’s health was absolutely worth the effort to get them to the doctor and get them vaccinated.

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Elise

Posted at 10:11 AM on January 5, 2014  

Vee seems to be your typical conspiracy nut who is looking for someone to say that all the medical journals and doctors are wrong and Jenny McCarthy is right. Yeah that makes sense, hey Vee please remind everyone what Jenny McCarthy’s medical and scientific background is. take your time, we’ll wait.

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Bryan

Posted at 5:45 PM on January 4, 2014  

Vaccines do not cause autism.

Jenny is wrong.

Moving on now because I dont take advice from people who pretend for a living.

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B

Posted at 2:14 PM on January 4, 2014  

She wasn’t all wrong, though. Kids with any sort of Neurological disorder usually have an extremely damaged gut and digestion, these kinds of children can be extremely damaged from vaccines. The vaccine wouldn’t necessarily be the cause of the disorder but it would be “the straw that broke the camels back” in a system that may have been far gone due to generations of poor diet. The most appropriate thing to do before vaccinating children would be to check all their immune functions and gut flora before administering a vaccine. There are ways to heal these children before giving them more that their body cannot handle. If a child is healthy after being checked their body should be able to handle the vaccine fine. Doing solo vaccines is also a good option; instead of doing the MMR all together doing each as a separate vaccine. In nature it would be unlikely to get all these things at the same time. That said, Jenny’s son still could have been damaged by that vaccine. It’s not just Autism, it’s all neurological issues caused by poor gut health.

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Sean Maddox

Posted at 3:27 PM on January 4, 2014  

And what medical evidence and expertise do you have to prove this? So tired of nitwits like you dirtying the waters so badly that we can’t even have a discussion based on basic facts and scientific understanding.

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Colin Jensen

Posted at 4:31 PM on January 4, 2014  

All three of my doctors said the same thing, so I’ll trust them over the “everybody knows _____” internet.

 
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Winifred

Posted at 6:24 PM on January 4, 2014  

I think the Colin is a liar. My inlaws agree. They ARE doctors.

 
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Winifred

Posted at 7:49 PM on January 4, 2014  

Actually I think I misread Colin’s statement. Sorry. I accidentally took it as an anti vaccine statement.

 
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jordan

Posted at 5:51 PM on January 4, 2014  

If the child’s body can’t “handle” the vaccine, how will it “handle” the actual disease?

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Winifred

Posted at 6:20 PM on January 4, 2014  

No, honey, no. Just give it up and LISTEN to what every Doctor says. Immunize your kids. Only a dip s*** would listen to Jenny McCarthy instead of a trained medical professional.

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Raymond G. Whitham

Posted at 7:33 PM on January 4, 2014  

The fact you don’t identify yourself tells a lot about your non-credentials. As a communicable disease epidemiologist, I can tell you have absolutely no idea whatsoever what your talking about.

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Hope

Posted at 11:11 AM on January 5, 2014  

I’m glad you brought up the gut flora. There is a test that can be done at birth to test the gut flora. Its called research people. Its called not trusting everything you hear, getting more than one opinion, and making the best decision for yourself and your family. I have personally researched this topic as I have a young son, and the link between children with Autism and their poor gut flora is a fact. Unfortunately they get this from their mother. I have reread and checked that information from credible doctors as well as Medical Journals. I’m not against vaccinations per se, I don’t think the flu shot is necessary if you lead a healthy life and can fight it naturally, but its all about researching. Inform yourselves and then have your child tested to see if they have a poor gut flora when they are born-its a non invasive test. Your gut is linked to your brain. If your gut can’t handle it as a newborn, your brain may not either. Its a non-invasive test and you will know right away to vaccinate all at once, or spread it out. I am no doctor, I don’t claim to be…but I am a mother. And I will never put something in my cihld’s body without weighing all the options first and researching what is inside of it. Vaccines, Food, Soaps etc. Be aware, and don’t trust so easily. Jenny may be in the public eye, but she is also a mother. And what she says is mere opinion.

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Moe Berg

Posted at 1:42 PM on January 4, 2014  

The article may be old and it may be misquoted. Her continued effect on children who will get sick or will die because their parents listened to her and her “experts” will carry on and as such these articles are doing some good.

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JMF

Posted at 1:21 PM on January 4, 2014  

I would still do her!

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Merridee

Posted at 11:54 AM on January 4, 2014  

The damage has been done. Her anti-vax work has contributed to millions of parents choosing not to vaccinate their kids and as a result we now have had severe measles and whooping cough outbreaks across the country and there is no sign of it slowing down. They put the public at risk because of their reliance on debunked science.

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PB

Posted at 12:01 PM on January 4, 2014  

So true! She is a menace!

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Prakash Kapur

Posted at 1:17 PM on January 4, 2014  

A hot menace though… look at those bodacious ta-ta’s!

 
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JulieB

Posted at 6:54 PM on January 4, 2014  

Yes! and can you believe the parents who don’t know what “herd immunity” is? They think, it’s OK, for kids to skip the vaccine as long as mine are. They do not know that these diseases rely on a certain percentage of kids being vaccinated against them or else they will infect the whole group as has happened.

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Anais_Nin

Posted at 10:38 AM on January 4, 2014  

Ok, stupids. Here’s the thing: An Italian court ruled last year that a mandated vaccine caused a small Italian boy autism. The jury was not made up of playboy models and no, you cannot use your lifeline (the flimsy pamphlet produced by the vaccine manufacturer you skimmed in your GP’s waiting room) to argue this fact.
Mothers of autistic children have been saying it for decades but now its on record. Legally. So.
Decide whether you want your child to have measles for a few weeks( like we all used to- hello????) or whether you want to risk forcibly inflicting a chemical cocktail that has been legally proven to induce autism on your child.
You are parents now. READ. And fricken grow a pair.

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Btrain

Posted at 11:00 AM on January 4, 2014  

Ok Stupid, A court of LAW is no place for Scientific debate nor Scientific ruling. These things happen in peer reviewed Journals between scientists. Judges and Lawyers deal with law, not with science and the scientific method. The fact that this Italian court ruled this has no merrit on the fact that Vaccines according to science do not cause autism.

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Anais_Nin

Posted at 11:28 AM on January 4, 2014  

Dear Lord. So, you think the pharmaceutical company in question DID NOT hire their schmickest legal team and employ every scientific article on record to have this case quashed? Yeah. Ok. They lost the case because the jury wanted to get back to their Chianti. Jesus.

 
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Moe Berg

Posted at 1:23 PM on January 4, 2014  

@ Anais_Nin – How did you know about the Chianti?

 
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Reivec

Posted at 11:03 AM on January 4, 2014  

A court ruling is FAR from being proof. A court is not scientific in the slightest and is ruled more by emotion than logic. And courts have been PROVEN to make mistakes all the time, as in, scientifically proven through DNA evidence and other forms of forensic science. If your best argument for your belief is that a random courtroom in Italy also agreed with you, you are on shaky ground at best.

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Sean Maddox

Posted at 3:31 PM on January 4, 2014  

She doesn’t care. She wants to continue risking her childrens’ and the larger communities health for ridiculous belief with not scientific or factual grounding what so ever. Also, Measles can and is deadly along with the plethora of other easily preventable diseases your ignorance is allowing to gain a societal foothold again. Thanks.

 
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erintheoptimist

Posted at 11:06 AM on January 4, 2014  

One Italian jury made up, presumably, of randomly-chosen laypeople, against the entire bulk of medical evidence worldwide, involving literally millions of subjects and thousands of researchers? Are you for real?

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J Stinson

Posted at 12:09 PM on January 4, 2014  

Yeah…measles like we all had. Good ol’ measles. Measles that causes permanent brain damage or death in a percentage of those who contract it . Measles that is the single biggest cause of death in refugee camps. While we’re at it, lets get rid of polio vaccine and antibiotics. How about cancer treatments? A total wast of time. Appendectomies? let it burst, rub some dirt in it and it’ll be just fine. I fear for your children…

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Delles

Posted at 12:19 PM on January 4, 2014  

I love you.

 
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Rad

Posted at 1:07 PM on January 4, 2014  

Is this the same Italian court that convicted and jailed geologists for failing to predict a deadly earthquake?

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Moe Berg

Posted at 1:21 PM on January 4, 2014  

Yes – the Italian courts that understand science really well. Using them to prove this point only weakens your point. They are as good a judge of medical science as the following verdict: “Man’s sex with 11-year-old not abusive, Italian court rules”

 
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Moe Berg

Posted at 1:34 PM on January 4, 2014  

Sorry Rad – my comment wasn’t actually being critical of yours – sorry.

 
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Patrick Freedom Eagle Sparks

Posted at 1:17 PM on January 4, 2014  

So does correlation imply causality?

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Eileen

Posted at 1:30 PM on January 4, 2014  

An Italian court is still trying to convict an innocent Amanda Knox of murder…..duh Do I have respect for the Italian court system…
I think not!!

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Luka

Posted at 1:39 PM on January 4, 2014  

Measles? Are you mixing this up with Chicken pox? Because chicken pox is the harmless one, measles can be deadly, sweetheart.

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erintheoptimist

Posted at 2:00 PM on January 4, 2014  

Chicken pox isn’t harmless either. It’s less deadly than measles, which begins with a fever high enough to scramble your brain, but plenty of people end up with complications from chicken pox and a small percentage end up dead. The thing with the chicken pox is that the older you are when you get it, the better the chance that it will be really serious, which means that if people don’t vaccinate their kids or otherwise ensure their children’s immunity, one result is to raise the average age of infection higher into the danger zone, resulting in more complications. And that’s without even mentioning the added complications of getting something like chicken pox at a time when you’re sick with something else. I know a child who came down with chicken pox when she was an in-patient at Toronto’s Hospital for Sick Children. In addition to complicating the diagnosis that put her there, she exposed a hospital full of Canada’s sickest children to something that could have killed them – and it could have been prevented, had she been vaccinated.

This is also why we vaccinate against rubella, which on its own is not a big deal. However, if a woman gets it during her first trimester of pregnancy, her baby is likely to end up with brain damage. That’s why it’s on the standard vaccination list. Mumps, too – not a big deal unless you’re a young man, in which case you can lose some or all of your testicular function, i.e. be rendered infertile.

 
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NyteShayde

Posted at 3:17 PM on January 4, 2014  

The zosters virus is not harmless. There are a population of people who are not able to be completely vaccinated against it, myself being one of them. I have to have a yearly titer and additional immunizations yearly to keep my job as a healthcare worker. Frankly, I would appreciate it if these idiots would stop putting me and everyone else’s health and my professional life, in danger.

 
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Stanton Fink

Posted at 10:09 PM on January 4, 2014  

Chicken pox in adults can be potentially life-threatening, if not extremely debilitating. And then there is the problem of shingles.

 
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NyteShayde

Posted at 3:10 PM on January 4, 2014  

I am a mother of an autistic child. I’m also a healthcare worker who knows better. my child was born autistic. Nothing “gave” her autism. The Italian government is corrupt and everyone in the EU knows it. They’ll go back three months from now and reverse the ruling and do so several more times. Vaccines DO NOT cause autism and repeatedly saying it isn’t going to make it so.

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Timothy Coe

Posted at 3:17 PM on January 4, 2014  

A court of law also said that OJ was not guilty, that George Zimmerman was not guilty, that black people were property, etc, etc, etc. I’m a lawyer, courts get things wrong all the time. You can find an expert to say anything. You know who didn’t get it worng? Jonas Salk.

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John Smithe

Posted at 2:12 AM on January 5, 2014  

Zimmerman wasn’t guilty. On the topic of vaccines well I’ll vaccinate my kids because better safe than sorry, but I am not 100% trusting on them. The healthcare industry exists to make a profit off illness. The vaccines will protect you from dying since dead people can’t buy medicine, but they aren’t nearly as effective as claimed, and probably do open you up to other long term chronic illnesses that bring in the green for doctors and the drug companies.

 
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Winifred

Posted at 6:30 PM on January 4, 2014  

Guess what moron, kids die without vaccines. If you have a kid and you choose not to vaccinate you are ignorant and willfully neglectful. You should have your child taken away before they get sick and die. You are a horrible mother. My cousin did not vaccinate. Her daughter caught viral meningitis. She lost her hearing and almost died. If you want to risk your child’s health and well being then go ahead. Your kid will hate you for all of the misery you are inflicting on them.

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Raymond G. Whitham

Posted at 7:37 PM on January 4, 2014  

A court, as in lawyers and legal judges – NOT those who are experts in the field. Next time you get sick, you can go to a lawyer while the rest of us will leave medicine to medical and public health professionals.

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Michael Collins

Posted at 9:51 PM on January 4, 2014  

You are a complete idiot. My youngest brother was never vaccinated for measles. He had a really bad case of it for a few weeks. He died. Yes you can die from measles. Why do you think people vaccinate against these diseases? It’s certainly not because of the inconvenience of catching them.

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hmariehicks

Posted at 11:16 AM on January 5, 2014  

Thank you! Everyone against these accusations either don’t have a child with Autism so they haven’t been forced to research these things. OR, they have never READ from a source that doesn’t just say the obvious, what the public wants to hear, and what essentially brings in billions of dollars.

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erintheoptimist

Posted at 1:21 PM on January 5, 2014  

So. . . if it’s obvious, i.e. if it matches what scientists have said all along, it has to be false?

You’re a conspiracy nut.

I work with kids with autism and I have two in my extended family. I’ve helped their parents do the research, I’ve done it myself for the sake of my students’ families. Just because my conclusions differ from yours doesn’t mean that I didn’t do my research.

 
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hmariehicks

Posted at 4:13 PM on January 5, 2014  

Because our opinions differ…I’m a conspiracy nut? This article is false by the way. She came out and said her child still does have Autism. I am a Special Education Teacher and many children with Autism are on gluten free diets for a reason. Poor gut flora-affecting their development in their brain. I have a leading Nutritionist and Neurologist in my family who have similar opinions. Doesn’t make it true. But definitely makes their opinion trustworthy. Anything against the norm or what big paying companies say to the public has got to be a conspiracy these days or scare tactics. I say its pretty pathetic believing everything you hear from people who are making money off of you. Looks like we both did research..and have different opinions.

 
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Vee

Posted at 7:28 AM on January 4, 2014  

From Jenny’s Twitter: “Stories circulating online, claiming that I said my son Evan may not have autism after all, are blatantly inaccurate and completely ridiculous. Evan was diagnosed with autism by the Autism Evaluation Clinic at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Hospital and was confirmed by the State of California (through their Regional Center). The implication that I have changed my position, that my child was not initially diagnosed with autism (and instead may suffer from Landau-Kleffner Syndrome), is both irresponsible and inaccurate. These stories cite a “new” Time Magazine interview with me, which was actually published in 2010, that never contained any such statements by me. Continued misrepresentations, such as these, only serve to open wounds of the many families who are courageously dealing with this disorder. Please know that I am taking every legal measure necessary to set this straight.”

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mike

Posted at 1:12 PM on January 4, 2014  

How can that be twitter? It is more than 120 words.

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Eric Levonian

Posted at 5:19 PM on January 4, 2014  

How can that be Jenny? Everything is spelled correctly and the grammar is essentially perfect.

 
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Moe Berg

Posted at 1:37 PM on January 4, 2014  

I would love to know where that was posted (could not have been twitter obviously) because I would highlight her use of the the expression ” is both irresponsible and inaccurate” that is RICH coming from her. I would laugh if it wasn’t so sad.

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Raymond G. Whitham

Posted at 7:44 PM on January 4, 2014  

She uses the words “inaccurate”, “irresponsable”, “misrepresentations” which are words that describe her uneducated, clueless, and heinous attack against vaccinations, science, and common sense.

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JNP

Posted at 6:34 AM on January 4, 2014  

An excellent example of someone doing the wrong (i.e., pathologically misinformed) thing for the the right reasons (i.e., because she wants to protect children). A sweet, albeit dangerously misguided, person.

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e_93

Posted at 2:25 AM on January 4, 2014  

This is what happens when you take your advice from a Playboy model.Of course they are know for being soooooo smart right?

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Prakash Kapur

Posted at 1:16 PM on January 4, 2014  

I’d still bang her though, cause she’s hot as hell.

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Sarah

Posted at 12:22 AM on January 4, 2014  

People, do you ever bother to look at dates? You all are commenting on an article from February 2010! SMH

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John P. Squibob

Posted at 11:56 PM on January 3, 2014  

Can we finally blame for the deaths of people ’caused by their parents believing McCarthy’s tripe now?

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Sarah

Posted at 12:23 AM on January 4, 2014  

This is an old article from 2012…

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Sarah

Posted at 12:29 AM on January 4, 2014  

*2010, not 2012 oops lol

 
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Stacy D

Posted at 12:32 AM on January 4, 2014  

John if we are blaming Jenny McCarthy for bad parenting, the world is in deep trouble… Let’s place blame where it belongs… Lazy people not doing their due diligence and researching information and facts for themselves… If you believe what celebrities say just because they are celebrities that is pretty sad, and if you are looking to place blame, look in the mirror because you are looking at the problem.
I am not directing this directly at you, but people who are quick to blame celebrities, place too much emphasis on their importance in the world… Get away from your TV and start living in the real world. Read a book, do some research and learn from real experts, find real role models… And remember at the end of the day we are all human.

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Charles Thomas Shaner

Posted at 4:08 AM on January 4, 2014  

Amen sister

 
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KC

Posted at 9:43 AM on January 4, 2014  

So true. Thank you for writing this.

 
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Joe

Posted at 11:44 PM on January 3, 2014  

I myself have 2 sons diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. I know it is easy to focus so much on the cause of the autism. We need more research absolutely. With all that said living with a child and searching for a cure for his/her autism doesn’t help your child in that moment. We need to shed more light on how amazing children can cope with and live with autism and blossom into wonderful adults. She made a mistake a big mistake being an advocate for parents against vaccines. However not once did I allow her opinion to lead me a stray from what I should have been doing as a parent. I have a amazing doctor who I trust with my life. As parents we need to take responsibility as well for following and taking advice from anyone other than a precessional. She is an actress a playmate, not a doctor. Hopefully this can teach Jenny an important lesson and all parents out there to save the medical advice for the professionals. I am thrilled to hear of her sons improvements thats wonderful and I pray for his growth and development to continue. God bless all the children and adults living with Autism I am inspired everyday by all of you for your courage and strength.

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Chris

Posted at 11:23 PM on January 3, 2014  

If you took medical advice from her You are a bad parent!!!

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Joe

Posted at 11:49 PM on January 3, 2014  

I agree with you Chris when it comes to your children’s health be very cautious and talk to doctors and health care professionals.

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nicole

Posted at 10:08 PM on January 3, 2014  

Can we focus on the fact this was written in 2010! This is not based on a new article.

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Moe Berg

Posted at 10:10 PM on January 3, 2014  

Uh Oh – shame on us here for not checking more closely. Shame on this Site for publishing this.

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Sarah

Posted at 12:30 AM on January 4, 2014  

Shame on what site. It was written AND published in 2010… Shame is only in those who believe everything they read. The internet says it is so, so it must be truth! SMH

 
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PurplesShade

Posted at 10:26 AM on January 4, 2014  

Ahh, I see what you mean.
This is indeed entirely based on speculations.
Though you make a valid point on the general subject matter too, we wouldn’t even be reading this article if more people were careful about their reading, given how easily Mccarthy’s lies have spread through the internet.
Yes, I also wish people were more careful in reading, though I think it matters much much less when it’s just about an aspect of someones personal life, gossip like this, when compared to allowing yet another child to die from a vaccine preventable disease. :\

 
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PurplesShade

Posted at 4:00 AM on January 4, 2014  

Why does that matter? It’s new to the people reading it, the conversation and the insights they may have are also new because it is new to them — So it doesn’t matter when this was published.
There’s nothing wrong with having the conversation. Why are you so hung up on the date?

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Sarah

Posted at 9:33 AM on January 4, 2014  

I am ‘hung up’ on the fact that too many read AND believe everything that they.read on the web. I am more than open to rational discussion on any topic. But not having all the facts, one being that this is a false publication -her son is autistic to this day- and that people are so quick to judge and hate based on fallacies is what drives me loopy.

 
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NyteShayde

Posted at 3:23 PM on January 4, 2014  

So what?

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jennifer b

Posted at 9:38 PM on January 3, 2014  

I’m confused… how could her son be only 7yo… he was born in 2002?

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Andy Pandy

Posted at 9:50 PM on January 3, 2014  

because of all articles like this there are inconsitances with the information…thats what started it all those years ago… a misdiagnosed child… and she wasnt the only one saying MMR caused autism, a leading medical journal also stated it… then retracted years later.. The trouble with diagnosis of neurological disorders is that often different diseases mimic the symptoms, and it VERY difficult to give a definitive diagnosis, I can say all you folks shouting naysayers, would have reacted in the same way if it was your child, and a Professional had diagnosed your child as autistic… there but for the grace of god eh.

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Kirsten Houseknecht

Posted at 10:40 PM on January 3, 2014  

the medical journal the Lancet withdrew the article on the MMR vaccine because the fellow who “did the study” didnt revcveal he was in fact trying to market a rival vaccine….

 
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NyteShayde

Posted at 3:25 PM on January 4, 2014  

…the scientist in question was also ousted from the scientific community for falsifying data (lying).

 
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Cetra

Posted at 9:58 PM on January 3, 2014  

This article was written in 2010, before his 8th birthday.

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Heather

Posted at 10:00 PM on January 3, 2014  

Because the article was published in 2010, so at the time he was probably about to turn 8.

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Phillip

Posted at 11:55 PM on January 3, 2014  

Because this article was published in 2010 (check the date at the top of the page) and for some reason people are linking to it 3 years later.

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Lara Lohne

Posted at 9:34 PM on January 3, 2014  

NO SHE WILL NOT BE THE VOICE OF THE DISORDER! Autistics themselves are the true voice of the disorder. She has absolutely NO experience with autism, therefore she has nothing she can add to the discussion. She needs to take her poison and peddle it somewhere else, if she insists on speaking. Frankly, I’m still surprised that anyone is still listening to her. She isn’t even an ‘autism mom’ since her son isn’t autistic. I am autistic, my partner is autistic and our son is also autistic. I don’t consider myself an expert on autism. Together, though, my family and the many other autistics in my community are experts, more than any neurotypical professional could ever be, because we LIVE it, every day. Since everyone is different, everyone’s experience is different, there isn’t one single individual who is an expert, therefore no one single individual can be ‘the voice’ of the disorder. That is especially true for someone who has no medial training, no background in neurology and no personal experience with autism. Autism has a voice, and it is one voice of many hundreds of thousands of autistics all speaking together. And even though I’m just one person, I’m pretty certain the rest in my community would agree that Jenny McCarthy does not speak for us, any more than Autism Speaks does!

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Ganondox

Posted at 7:37 AM on January 4, 2014  

Amen. This porn star needs to STFU.

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Terry Farrell

Posted at 9:26 PM on January 3, 2014  

what do you mean her son “…may never have had autism…” You make it sound like there’s a possibility that he HAD autism and it miraculaously went away. Autism is an incurable condition. He either has it or he doesn’t. TERRIBLE writing.

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jack

Posted at 9:36 PM on January 3, 2014  

No. It means that he never had it.

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Paul Dennett

Posted at 8:21 PM on January 3, 2014  

Thanks for all the potential damage you caused by speaking out and providing fuel for conspiracy theorists and alternative medicine nutjobs to preach about the evils of vaccination and pray on the fears of over-protective parents. Shame on you, and shame on every anti-vaccine lunatic out there who contributes to putting children’s lives at risk…not just their own, but others who may catch harmful diseases due to unvaccinated kids carrying them.
The illness your son suffered must have been scary…but serious repurcussions from vaccines are so unbelievably rare it’s obvious there is no causal link or need for hysteria. Any medicine may have an unforseen effect on certain people….that does NOT mean that people should fear monger out of some bizarre need for retribution. Any child who suffered harm due to your campaigning is firmly on YOUR head Ms McCarthy…think about that as you cradle your son.

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Jeff

Posted at 9:24 PM on January 3, 2014  

There is no need to “shame” her. She wasn’t a doctor claiming that vaccines cause autism, she was ad is a parent trying to do everything she could to help her son. Misinformed, yes, uneducated, yes, cause for shame, absolutely not. She is just being a mom that loves her son.

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Terry Farrell

Posted at 9:29 PM on January 3, 2014  

Actually Jeff, she was indeed claiming that vaccines cause autism, despite the fact that she is not a doctor. She was on every talk show in NA making the claim. She was a menace to the health system, fearmonging and spreading conspiracy theories. \

 
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Moe Berg

Posted at 9:50 PM on January 3, 2014  

Sorry Jeff – you are out of touch here. She was using her celebrity influence influence; garnering huge public attention, speaking on hundreds of talk radio and tv shows, railing against the “evils” of all vaccinations. She had immense credibility just due to the number of other idiot celebrities who allowed her to spew on their shows, including one of the most influential – Oprah – the master purveyor of feces who is considered a demi-god by millions. The fact that she had no actual medical credentials was lost on all these people who followed her into the abyss of junk-science. I blame her directly for the deaths of hundreds of children who would otherwise have been vaccinated and protected.

 
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Andy Pandy

Posted at 9:55 PM on January 3, 2014  

….and that claim was perpetuated by medical PROFESSIONALS at the time. She was being the public spokesperson to try and ensure that children were not damaged by vaccines, which several professional medical studies and journals claimed was the case then.

 
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Jeff

Posted at 10:03 PM on January 3, 2014  

Again, she isn’t a doctor. She is a mom. Lighten up on the bashing.

 
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Greg

Posted at 10:31 PM on January 3, 2014  

I know as a parent of a child with Autism I was desperate for an answer after my son’s diagnosis. He began displaying signs soon after his MMR shot. Did that cause his Autism? I’ll never know! You eventually come to a point where what caused it really isn’t important…you just love your child and keep on trying! Jenny McCarthy was just looking for an answer. I’m glad her son doesn’t have Autism and is improving.

 
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